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R is for Roundabouts.

magic roundaboutRoundabouts do seem to be the bugbear of a lot of drivers, why is this the case? Is it down to how they were by trained by their driving instructor? Or is it something else?

Believe this or not here are instructors out there that will only teach learners just enough to get through the driving test, thus, effectively short changing them. But what people don’t realise is that teaching roundabouts is not covered on the test that driving instructors have to pass to actually become an instructor.

The final test they have to pass is a test of their ability to teach, and roundabouts are not on this test, so believe it or not there are driving instructor training establishments that don’t teach new instructors how to teach roundabouts, so they too are being short changed and are left to work this out for themselves.
Now it should be straight forward.

A roundabout is an evolution of the simple crossroads. In effect it is just a cross roads with an island in the middle. So if you approaching a cross roads with 2 lanes and you wanted to turn left, unless the road markings tell you otherwise you would signal left on the approach and choose the left lane, If you were going ahead you would choose the left lane and not signal on the approach. If you were turning right you would approach in the right lane and signal right.

It is more or less the same when approaching a roundabout, you will signal left for left, nothing for straight on and right for right, simple.

However, once you are on the roundabout, well not on it, but going around it you treat it as a one-way street and just tell people when you are going to turn off by signalling left just after the last exit you are not taking.

The challenge comes with multi-lane or gyroscopic roundabouts; you do have to read the road markings and signs. A gyroscopic Roundabout should guide you off by the use of the road markings, simply stay in the correct lane for your exit and the road markings will move over as you get nearer to your exit; however you still need to look for the signs and road markings and of course use your common sense.
So to see the road markings you will need to keep space between you and the vehicle in front. If you are too close then you will not have time to see and read the markings effectively.

If you are negotiating a multi exit roundabout where they have more than four exits or if the four exits don’t form a crossroads, then this is a rule of thumb you can use, the clock face rule, tread the approach to the roundabout as 6. The first exit will be treated as left; any exits after 12 noon will be treated as right turn. For example if it was a clock face you would approach from 6 o clock, 12 o clock will be opposite and after 12 noon is a right turn, 12 noon is treated as straight on and any exists between 12 noon and the first exit will be treated as going ahead.

What overrides this rule are the road markings and signs, always follow the advice of the road markings and signs.

Finally let’s look at mini roundabouts? A mini-roundabout usually has a blue circular sign with 3 white arrows telling you that you MUST drive around it. It is the same sort of sign that you see on a bollard, you know the blue one with the white arrow telling you to pass on the left or right. Not many drivers will ignore this sign and pass on the wrong side, but there are many drivers who will over the top of the mini roundabout without a second thought.

However, both signs have the same legal standing they are both giving orders and it is an offence to ignore the sign, on a mini roundabout the Highway Code states “all vehicles must pass around the central markings. The exception is large vehicles that are physically unable to drive around the central markings; they are allowed to use the space as they need to. , As this rule is a must in the Highway Code it carries a penalty of 3 points and a fine, all blue signs give orders. Mini roundabouts are used to give everyone a fair chance of getting out of the junction; also they are a form of traffic calming. So please respect them.
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O is for Observations

DSC01541It goes without saying you should be looking where you are going while you are driving, enough said I think.

I once asked a driver, fully qualified one, who had been driving for 30+ years, what they had just got from the training session they had just been on. They said: “This looking forward thing is a good one”. I am sure they meant looking in the far distance is a good thing, well I hope that’s what they meant anyway.
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Q is for Queues

me firstWell, it goes without saying as the great British public we just love to queue, don’t we? In supermarkets, bus stops, fair grounds, we will form an orderly queue and take our turn unless you in the ‘short dated fresh food’ aisle in the supermarket, you know the one where they reduce the items that you going to get thrown out they don’t sell them, so you just might get something with 10p off.

Hopefully, we won’t get to this level of me first, as seen in the picture. 

Anyway, when it comes to driving it seems we don’t like queuing. We see drivers on a daily basis trying to get that elusive one car ahead by swopping lanes, pushing in at the front of the queue and even trying not to allow anyone else in the queue.

There is an easy way of stopping people pushing in when we are queuing, especially when two lanes are going into one. Really simple, just let them in, how can they possibly push in if you are allowing them, it simply puts you in charge. It is just like holding the door open for someone; it is a choice to let them go first, so why not make this choice on the road?

But there are people out there who don’t want others to have the advantage on them and they will see someone getting in front of them as taking the advantage, not just someone who is just making a journey.

In the situation of two lanes going into one, some drivers will block two lanes to stop other people getting past them, therefore effectively blocking the carriageway. Now this is where it can go wrong. It is actually an offence to block the public highway so they can in fact be prosecuted for this.

On the other hand, how many of us have got into the wrong lane or noticed that the lane we are in is closing shortly? And we will have to swap lanes; we can then find that other drivers won’t let us in because they are assuming we have done it on purpose.

There are also the people who are driving somewhere on a personal or medical emergency and are desperate to get somewhere quickly, but we conveniently forget about these people and just assume they are pushing in on purpose as well or that they are just horrible people.

Now let’s do something positive and look for a solution. Hold on the solution is already in the Highway Code, it is Rule 134. We call this zip-merging; where everyone queues in both lanes and at the point of where one lane closes then each driver takes a turn, for example each driver will allow one car in front hence the term zip-merging.

Let’s look at the difference in the two ways: One way is to all get in a queue as soon as we are warned one of the lanes is closing. This can cause the queue stretch for miles from the point of closure, so far back it could affect junctions or roundabouts , so everyone is queuing in one lane at least one mile back or at the very least at the first sign stating the lane is going to close. Now there will be drivers who are a further mile back that won’t even know the lane is closing as they have not seen the sign, so will continue until they realise they have to get over, who is going to let them in?

So now the queue could be more than two miles long that will mean there are two miles of empty road in the other lane of wasted space. This traffic jam could, in effect, block junctions and roundabouts, causing increase congestion on the surrounding roads.

If we all zip merge this would free all this wasted space up, we would end up with two queues of one mile each, using the road space effectively with each driver taking turns to move in at the point the lanes merge into one. This means that both queues would continue to move and the traffic would clear more quickly, and the surrounding roads would be less affected. However this can still be spoilt by the lane hopper. They see some sort of advantage if moving from lane to lane as they may perceive one lane is moving faster than the other, realistically they might even get two cars ahead instead of the usual one.

So please remember try to zip-merge and let people in if they want to, it puts you in charge, use the road space wisely.
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N is for Night time risks.

People will often say that it is safer to break the speed limit or go through red traffic lights late at night or early morning, because there is no one else about. There may be less people around but there are people around! However, the people who are sharing the road with you at the time are all thinking the same, “I can take a few more risks as there is no one else around”
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M is for Mobile phones, the modern epidemic, why do you use yours?

using a mobile phone and driving You have all heard the statistic “you are 4 times more like to crash while using a mobile phone, compared to when you are not”. Most of us stop reading there, however hands free is no safer. In fact it is not the holding of the phone that is the major distraction it is the conversation. We simply cannot multitask. Yes I know you can walk along and chew gum at the same time but what we are talking about is cognitive multitasking, or doing 2 thinking tasks at the same time. We just think we can.
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Our reviews on Facebook

Insight2drive.co.uk
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Malaika Wong
Malaika Wong
2018-12-04T09:44:39+0000
My 17 year old daughters confidence was knocked by a previous instructor. On her first lesson with Kerrie, she had big smiles. Thanks to Kerrie's teaching methods my daughter no longer hated driving and passed first time! Fabulous instructor and beautiful person. Thank you so much for all your hard work. I'm a happy and proud mum.
Peter Moon New
Peter Moon New
2018-09-14T02:12:45+0000
I have to say Kathy is THE best driving instructor/trainer in the area.. and all of her instructors are amazingt!.. I'm an ADI and am booked up for months ahead s3o there is no ulterior motive. If you want to pass you're test.. this is honestly the best driving school in the Merseyside area!
Kriss James
Kriss James
2018-07-31T15:16:25+0000
Just want to say how much of a fantastic instructor Karen is. Karen made me feel very comfortable as a learner and made the lessons fun and engaging. Thank you so so much.
Karen Errity
Karen Errity
2018-04-15T17:37:41+0000
Loved doing my ADI Training with insight2drive. Why? It was fun and hardwork at the same time. Since becoming a professional ADI, I enjoy being part of a team of like minded instructors whose aim is to teach safe competent driving for life and not just pass a test. Kathy and the training team continue to provide CPD (continuous professional development) to all the team so we keep our standards high, which makes us the best training academy in the region for learners to be the best they can. 5 stars all the way guys �����
Debra Jordan
Debra Jordan
2018-04-15T10:07:09+0000
The best !! Kathy and the team provide the best support, catering for whatever needs the pupil has, can't recommend them enough
Ellie Ianson
Ellie Ianson
2017-11-30T18:47:41+0000
Leanne was recommended to me by a friend in work, after being let down by my previous driving instructor who couldn't fit lessons in for me around my work schedule. After failing my first driving test at Southport in the summer with my previous instructor, I had already rebooked my test in Norris Green for the beginning of November when i started my lessons with Leanne in September. We had a lot of work to do in a short space of time. Leanne went out of her way to make time for me and pushed me to do the best i can. She was always thorough in her lessons and helped calm my nerves as i was a really anxious driver. I passed first time using insight2drive and can not thank Leanne enough for helping me, would recommend her to anyone!
Samantha Cain
Samantha Cain
2017-11-17T15:16:56+0000
One of their drivers Andy has robbed me off my money, cancelled on me every week with fake excuses and cancelled on my friend the next day with a complete other excuse so I asked for my money back (6 weeks in a row he cancelled), he then only partly gave me my money back (after waiting over 3 weeks for it) and kept the rest and is now ignoring all messages, I have contacted the company who are also blanking my messages. I’m not one to complain usually especially as he was previously a good instructor but taking somebody’s money and not repaying them back when you haven’t provided a service is disgraceful. I don’t see how you can expect someone to pass their test if you cancel most weeks. I have tried to sort this out with both Andy and Insight 2 Drive and both are now ignoring me so I will be taking this further
Danny Linacre
Danny Linacre
2017-07-23T18:53:04+0000
When I first started with Leanne I hadnt drove on the road for about 4 years and had really bad habits from driving a forklift she was really patient and I felt really comfortable with her all have the lessons were enjoyable and she managed to get threw in under 3 months with a 1st time pass I couldn't recommend insight2drive highly enough and especially Leanne she was brilliant.
Pauline Harvey
Pauline Harvey
2017-07-06T15:19:25+0000
I was recommended insight to drive by my friend Amanda who was also a driving instructor, I was buying a birthday package for my son, he was allocated Jerry Dowling as his instructor, I couldn't have asked for a better instructor he has helped Sam so much, and today he passed his test. Well done Sam and many thanks for all your help Jerry.
Jessica Claire
Jessica Claire
2015-03-16T15:06:24+0000
I began my driving lessons with another school shortly after my 18th birthday and it was horrific. I had an instructor who was a family friend and did us a 'discount' for this relationship. It was the biggest waste of time and money that i had ever invested in and after almost 40 hours of driving around Liverpool whilst he was on his phone and other distracting things I stopped and restarted when I was 20. I started with Leanne and after one lesson she gave me her estimated number of lessons I would require in order to pass to which i was shocked as it was so low!!! Even though I had a few bad habits from the instructor before. I absolutely loved my driving lessons and am writing this review 4 hours after passing 1st time in the time frame which Leanne had said it would be. She is an amazing instructor who I beyond trust and will be recommending to any friends or family who tell me they are thinking of learning to drive. I had an absolute ball on my lessons and am now considering to do my pass plus in order to do more lessons with her as i enjoyed them so much!! Many Thanks Leanne!! Don't think I could have done it without you!!
Sean O'leary
Sean O'leary
2014-10-25T18:59:23+0000
Passed my driving test first time with Stuart harrison adi would highly recommend Stuart to anyone who wants to learn to drive in a safe and confident way great instructor
Marie Boyd
Marie Boyd
2014-08-14T10:46:47+0000
Just passed my driving test with Barbra porter! Couldn't of asked for a better instructor.. So happy! From Abbie :) x
Lana McLean Mifa
Lana McLean Mifa
2014-07-14T22:12:21+0000
Joan An Vinny Bingham
Joan An Vinny Bingham
2014-06-22T23:48:17+0000
Connor Ledgerton
Connor Ledgerton
2014-05-08T18:39:44+0000
Jordan Parry
Jordan Parry
2014-02-05T22:17:44+0000
Dot Riley
Dot Riley
2013-12-19T23:04:27+0000
Autum Foster
Autum Foster
2013-12-19T01:26:23+0000
Sabrina Lai
Sabrina Lai
2013-12-17T00:54:32+0000
Līga Ločmele
Līga Ločmele
2013-12-15T23:21:15+0000
Iain Scarlett
Iain Scarlett
2013-12-14T23:10:44+0000
Susan Bunnell
Susan Bunnell
2013-12-12T14:52:07+0000
Dave Stone
Dave Stone
2013-12-09T07:59:22+0000
Guy Annan
Guy Annan
2013-11-27T06:35:39+0000
Wyn Owen
Wyn Owen
2013-11-19T14:21:53+0000
Christine Brennan
Christine Brennan
2013-11-03T22:40:46+0000
Colin Dickinson
Colin Dickinson
2013-11-02T09:59:54+0000
Henry Hipps
Henry Hipps
2013-10-30T22:38:20+0000
Andy Guile
Andy Guile
2013-10-10T13:54:03+0000
Ged Wilmot
Ged Wilmot
2013-10-08T20:46:30+0000
Tony Lane
Tony Lane
2013-09-23T13:19:05+0000
Granit Gojnovci
Granit Gojnovci
2013-09-16T14:51:27+0000
Louisa Hayhurst
Louisa Hayhurst
2013-09-05T08:59:39+0000

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